Deepfake Speaker Bios

Nitesh Chawla

Nitesh Chawla

Nitesh Chawla is the Frank M. Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, and Director of the Center on Network and Data Science (CNDS) at the University of Notre Dame. His research is focused on AI, machine learning, and network science fundamentals with interdisciplinary applications that address societal problems and advance the common good. He is the recipient of several awards and honors including the NIPS Classification Challenge Award, IEEE CIS Outstanding Early Career Award, the IBM Watson Faculty Award, the IBM Big Data and Analytics Faculty Award, the National Academy of Engineering New Faculty Fellowship, and 1st Source Bank Technology Commercialization Award. He has also received several best paper awards and nominations, and his students have also received several distinct honors and awards. In recognition of the societal and impact of his research, he was recognized with the Rodney Ganey Award and Michiana 40 Under 40. He is co-founder of Aunalytics, a data science software and solutions company.

Danielle Citron

Danielle Citron Photo

Danielle Citron, a 2019 MacArthur Fellow, is a professor of law at Boston University School of Law, where she teaches courses on privacy, free speech, and civil procedure. Her scholarship has appeared in the Yale Law Journal, California Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Boston University Law Review, Notre Dame Law Review, and many others. She serves as the vice president of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, a nonprofit devoted to the protection of civil rights and liberties in the digital age. She also serves on Twitter’s Trust and Safety Council and Facebook’s Nonconsensual Intimate Imagery Task Force. She works closely with lawmakers and law enforcement officials and has testified before the House Intelligence Committee on the challenges of misinformation and deep fakes. Before joining BU Law, she taught at the University of Maryland School of Law.

Edward Delp

Ed Delp

Edward Delp is the Charles William Harrison Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Purdue University. His research interests include image and video analysis, computer vision, medical imaging, multimedia security, media compression, communication and information theory. Delp is a fellow of the IEEE, a fellow of the SPIE, a fellow of the Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T), and a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. In 2004, he received the Technical Achievement Award from the IEEE Signal Processing Society for his work in image and video compression and multimedia security. In 2008, Delp received the Society Award from the IEEE Signal Processing Society — the highest award given by SPS, which cited his work in multimedia security and image and video compression. He is a registered professional engineer. He earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Cincinnati and his doctorate in electrical engineering from Purdue University.

Patrick Flynn

Pat Flynn

Patrick Flynn is chair of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, the Duda Family Professor of Engineering, and a concurrent professor of electrical engineering in the College of Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. His research interests include computer vision, biometrics, pattern recognition, computer graphics and scientific visualization, and mobile application development. Flynn has held faculty positions at Washington State University and The Ohio State University. In 2007–2008, he held a visiting scientist appointment at the National Institute of Standards and Technology during a sabbatical leave. He has received outstanding teaching awards from Washington State University and the University of Notre Dame and meritorious service, Golden Core, certificate of achievement, and technical achievement awards from the IEEE Computer Society. He earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering, master’s degree in computer science, and doctorate in computer science from Michigan State University.

Mary Anne Franks

Mary Anne Franks

Mary Anne Franks is a professor of law and dean’s distinguished scholar at the University of Miami, where she teaches criminal law, criminal procedure, First Amendment law, Second Amendment law, family law, and policy and technology law. Franks also is an affiliated faculty member of the University’s Department of Philosophy and serves as president and legislative and technology policy director of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, a nonprofit organization dedicated to combating online abuse and discrimination. Franks is the author of The Cult of the Constitution: Our Deadly Devotion to Guns and Free Speech. Her scholarship has appeared in the Harvard Law Review, California Law Review, and UCLA Law Review, among others. She has also authored numerous articles for the popular press, including The Atlantic, The Guardian, and TIME magazine. In 2013, Franks drafted the first model criminal statute on nonconsensual pornography (referred to as “revenge porn”) that has served as a template for multiple state laws and for pending federal legislation. She regularly advises legislators and tech industry leaders, including Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Microsoft, on issues relating to online privacy, extortion, harassment, and threats. Franks earned her master’s and doctorate degrees from Oxford University, where she studied as a Rhodes Scholar, and a juris doctorate degree from Harvard University.

Sam Gregory

Sam Gregory

Sam Gregory is program director for WITNESS, an organization dedicated to helping people anywhere use video and technology to protect and defend human rights. For 20 years, he has enabled people to use the power of the moving image and participatory technologies to create human rights change. He is an award-winning technologist, media-maker and advocate, who from 2010-2018 taught the first graduate-level course at Harvard on harnessing the power of new visual and participatory technologies for human rights change, and is currently the co-chair of the Partnership on AI’s Expert Group on Social and Societal Influence and on the Technology Advisory Board of the International Criminal Court. For the past eighteen months, he has focused his work on emerging threats at the intersection of AI, media manipulation and rising authoritarianism, with a particular focus on how to prepare better for deepfakes and synthetic media. As well as publishing widely in academic settings he has created innovative training programs and teaching texts and was lead editor on “Video for Change: A Guide for Advocacy and Activism.” He earned a bachelor’s degree from Oxford University and a master’s degree in public policy from the Harvard Kennedy School, attending as a Kennedy Memorial Scholar. 

Ser-Nam Lim

Ser Nam Lim

Ser-Nam Lim manages Facebook AI’s Computer Vision teams in the New York and Cambridge offices. His current research interests lie in the understanding of generative models, particularly in large scale generation, anomaly detection, representation learning, media manipulation and multimodal analysis. He earned his Ph.D. in Computer Vision at the University of Maryland, College Park, in 2005. Previously, he spent a decade at GE Research, where he was manager of the Computer Vision Lab, led several major company research initiatives, and was also PI of the IARPA CORE3D program. At Facebook, he is currently leading his team in an effort to detect media manipulation that has the potential to spread misinformation.

Kirsten Martin

Kirsten Martin

Kirsten Martin is an associate professor of strategic management and public policy at George Washington University’s School of Business where she researches privacy, technology, and corporate responsibility. She has written about privacy and the ethics of technology in leading academic journals across disciplines (Journal of Business Ethics, Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, Journal of Business Research) as well as practitioner publications. She is the research and business ethics editor for the Journal of Business Ethics and the recipient of NSF grants for her work on privacy, technology, and ethics. Martin is also a member of the advisory board for the Future Privacy Forum and the Census Bureau’s National Advisory Committee for her work on privacy and the ethics of Big Data. Martin is a fellow at the Business Roundtable Institute for Corporate Ethics for her work on stakeholder theory and trust. She earned her B.S. in engineering from the University of Michigan and her M.B.A. and doctorate degree from the University of Virginia’s Darden Graduate School of Business.

Mark McKenna

Mark McKenna headshot

Mark McKenna is the John P. Murphy Foundation Professor of Law at the Notre Dame Law School, Director of the Law School Program in Intellectual Property and Technology Law, and Acting Director of the Notre Dame Technology Ethics Center. He teaches and writes broadly in the areas of intellectual property and privacy law—having written on utility patent, design patent, trademark, copyright, the right of publicity, and aspects of privacy law. His most recent work has focused on the intersection of intellectual property rights regimes and the intersection of IP rights with adjacent rights. He has been a visiting professor at Stanford Law School, the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center, and the Turin University-WIPO Master of Laws in Intellectual Property Program. Prior to joining the Notre Dame faculty, McKenna was a member of the faculty at Saint Louis University School of Law and practiced law with an intellectual property firm in Chicago, where he primarily litigated trademark and copyright cases. He earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Notre Dame in 1997 and a juris doctorate degree from the University of Virginia School of Law.

Jessica M. Silbey

Jessica M. Silbey

Jessica M. Silbey is a professor of law; director of the Center for Law, Innovation, and Creativity (CLIC); and an affiliate professor in the Department of English at Northeastern University. Her research and teaching focus on law’s entanglement with other disciplines such as the humanities and social sciences. In addition to a law degree, she has a Ph.D. in comparative literature and draws on her studies of literature and film to better account for law’s force, both its effectiveness and failing as socio-political regulation. In April 2018, she was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to support work on a new book, Against Progress: Intellectual Property and Fundamental Values in the Internet Age. The book argues that intellectual property law is becoming a central framework through which to discuss essential socio-political issues, extending ancient debates over our most cherished values, refiguring the substance of “progress” in terms that demonstrate the urgency of art and science to social justice today. Her previous book “The Eureka Myth: Creators, Innovators, and Everyday Intellectual Property” was published in 2015. Silbey earned a bachelor’s degree from Stanford University and doctorate and juris doctorate degrees from the University of Michigan.

Matt Turek

Matthew Turek 220 235

Matt Turek is a program manager in DARPA’s Information Innovation Office (I2O). His research interests include computer vision, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and their application to problems with significant societal impact. Prior to his position at DARPA, Turek was at Kitware, Inc., where he led a team developing computer-vision technologies. His research focused on multiple areas, including large-scale behavior recognition and modeling; object detection and tracking; activity recognition; normalcy modeling and anomaly detection; and image indexing and retrieval. Turek has made significant contributions to multiple DARPA and Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) efforts and has transitioned large-scale systems for operational use. Turek previously worked for GE Global Research, conducting research in medical imaging and industrial inspection. He is a co-inventor on 14 patents and co-author of multiple publications, primarily in computer vision. Turek earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Clarkson University, a master’s in electrical engineering from Marquette University, and his doctorate in computer science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Elliott Visconsi

Elliott Visconsi

Elliott Visconsi is associate provost and chief academic digital officer at Notre Dame. A scholar of early modern English literature, freedom of expression, and First Amendment law, he also is an associate professor of English and concurrent associate professor of law. In his chief academic digital officer role, Visconsi works at the intersection of strategy, fundraising, faculty development, curriculum policy, intellectual property, financial modeling, and pedagogy on a variety of University-wide programs and initiatives. Under his leadership, Notre Dame created the Office of Digital Learning; launched a high-quality, fully online series of summer courses for Notre Dame students; designed from scratch a cutting-edge, multi-departmental graduate data science degree in collaboration with AT&T; and instituted a series of ongoing inter-institutional collaborations with colleges and universities. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the College of the Holy Cross, a doctorate from UCLA, and a master of legal studies from the Yale Law School.

Kaveh Waddell

Kaveh Waddell

Kaveh Waddell covers AI, robotics, and other emerging technology for the Axios Future newsletter, based in San Francisco. In the past, he has worked as a foreign correspondent in Beirut, reported on privacy and surveillance at The Atlantic, and written about tech policy at National Journal. He earned a bachelor’s degree in international politics and economics from Middlebury College.